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    Fight the Flu Banner

    COVID-19 joins the flu season

    Although COVID-19 hasn't settled on a 'season' as of yet, influeza has. It typically runs from October through mid-May, peaking in February.

    Of special note:

    • Flu and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, though they are caused by different viruses.
    • Because some symptoms of flu, COVID-19, the common cold and seasonal allergies are similar, people may need to be tested to first rule out COVID-19 as a possible cause their illness.
    • People can also be infected with both a flu virus and the virus that causes COVID-19 at the same time.
    • COVID-19 seems to spread more easily than flu and causes more serious illnesses in some people. Compared with people who have flu infections, people who have COVID-19 can take longer to show symptoms and be contagious for longer.

    The first and most important way to prevent the flu is to get vaccinated every year. Maximum protection occurs about two weeks after receiving the shot.


    Things to know about the 2021-2022 influenza (flu) season:

    • Since the influenza virus continues to mutate, the composition of flu vaccines has been updated to match current strains.
    • This season, all flu vaccines are designed to protect against four different flu viruses. (referred to as the quadrivalent vaccine)
    • The Flucelvax Quadrivalent flu vaccine is now approved for people 2 years and older.
    • Flu vaccines and COVID-19 vaccines can be given at the same time. Though there's limited data regarding giving the COVID-19 vaccines with other vaccines, experience with giving other vaccines together has shown the way our bodies develop protection and possible side effects are generally similar whether vaccines are given alone or with other vaccines.
    • Even though both vaccines can be given at the same visit, people should follow the recommended schedule for either vaccine: If you haven’t gotten your currently recommended doses of COVID-19 vaccine, get a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as you can, and ideally get a flu vaccine by the end of October.

    While it’s possible to still get sick with the flu after vaccination, the severity of the flu is significantly reduced and there are fewer complications than those who are unvaccinated.

    Getting vaccinated also helps protect people around you, including those who are more vulnerable to serious flu illness, like babies and young children, older people and people with certain chronic health conditions.

     

    These other tips are also recommended to protect yourself and others from the flu as well as COVID-19:

        Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

        Stay home from work, school and errands when you are sick.

        Cover your mouth with a tissue to contain coughing and sneezing --and a mask if you're out and about for your own protection.

        Wash your hands often with soap and water.

        Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

        Clean and disinfect commonly touched surfaces, especially when someone is ill.

     

    The latest information on influenza in Tarrant County is available at the top of this page, with the most recent report available as well as previous influenza reports.

    On this page you will find seasonal flu resources and a toolkit that we hope you find useful.

    We are relying on your support to help FIGHT THE FLU! in Tarrant County and beyond. We welcome your feedback.

     

     

    This page was last modified on October 14, 2021

    TARRANT COUNTY, TEXAS



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    100 E. Weatherford, Fort Worth, Texas 76196