HPV virus, teens jumping

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the United States. HPV is so common that nearly all sexually active men and women get it at some point in their lives.

How you get it

You can get HPV by having vaginal, anal or oral sex with someone who has the virus. It is most commonly spread during vaginal or anal sex. HPV can be passed even when an infected person has no signs or symptoms.

Anyone who is sexually active can get HPV, even if you have had sex with only one person. You also can develop symptoms years after you have sex with someone who is infected making it hard to know when you first became infected.

What it does

HPV virus

There are many different types of HPV. In most cases, HPV goes away on its own and does not cause any health problems. But when HPV does not go away, it can cause health problems like genital warts and cancer.

Genital warts usually appear as a small bump or group of bumps in the genital area. They can be small or large, raised or flat, or shaped like a cauliflower. A healthcare provider can usually diagnose warts by looking at the genital area.

HPV can cause cervical and other cancers  including cancer of the vulva, vagina, penis, or anus. It can also cause cancer in the back of the throat, including the base of the tongue and tonsils (called oropharyngeal cancer).

HPV warts

Cancer often takes years, even decades, to develop after a person gets HPV. The types of HPV that can cause genital warts are not the same as the types of HPV that can cause cancers. There is no way to know which people who have HPV will develop cancer or other health problems. People with weak immune systems (including individuals with HIV/AIDS) may be less able to fight off HPV and more likely to develop health problems from it. 

How to lower your chances of getting HPV.

Young woman getting vaccinated
Woman awaiting pap smear

 

Get vaccinated.

HPV vaccines are safe and effective. They can protect males and females against diseases (including cancers) caused by HPV when given in the recommended age groups. HPV vaccines are given in three shots over six months; it is important to get all three doses.

HPV vaccine can be found at all Tarrant County Public Health public health centers. Call ahead for more information.

 

 

Get screened for cervical cancer.

Routine screening for women aged 21 to 65 years old can prevent cervical cancer.

If you are sexually active:

  • Use latex condoms the right way every time you have sex. This can lower your chances of getting HPV. But HPV can infect areas that are not covered by a condom - so condoms may not give full protection against getting HPV;
  • Be in a mutually monogamous relationship – or have sex only with someone who only has sex with you.
     
Gardasil vaccine
condom

Other links

       

Additional resources

FACT SHEETS

2015 Recommended Immunizations for Children 7 - 18 Years Old

English            Spanish

 

HPV Vaccine for Preteens and Teens

English            Spanish

HPV and Cancer

English            Spanish

    

 

What Parents Should Know about HPV Vaccine Safety, Effectiveness

English            Spanish


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This page was last modified on January 18, 2023

TARRANT COUNTY, TEXAS

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