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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Kelly Hanes

    Senior Public Information Officer

    Tarrant County Public Health

    817-321-5306 direct

    dkhanes@tarrantcounty.com

    Health Officials Confirm Rubella Case

    Contacts being assessed and offered MMR vaccine if needed

     

    August 27, 2015 (Tarrant County, TX) – Tarrant County Public Health (TCPH) has confirmed an imported case of Rubella involving a student at Texas Christian University (TCU). The student recently traveled through a region with known Rubella cases.

    TCPH is actively working with school officials to trace possible contacts, assess immune status and offer immunization for those who have not completed their school-required MMR (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) vaccinations.

    Rubella is spread by contact with an infected person, through coughing and sneezing. It typically causes a rash in children that starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body, and a low fever (less than 101 degrees). These symptoms last two or three days. Older children and adults may also have swollen glands and cold-like symptoms before the rash appears. Aching joints occur in many cases, especially among young women. About half of the people who get Rubella do not have symptoms.

    Rubella is especially dangerous or problematic for non-immune pregnant women. It can cause serious birth defects or pregnancy loss.

    “Rubella is a disease that can spread amongst a crowd of non-immunized people. The good news is we have a very safe and effective MMR vaccine to prevent it,” says Health Director Vinny Taneja. “We are supporting TCU by working with all known contacts of this student and the university. We want to assure the TCU student body and our community that they are safe.”

    TCPH would like to remind residents that Rubella is a vaccine-preventable disease. People who have received a MMR vaccine series are considered immune. Those who have not been immunized against Rubella should contact their healthcare provider.

    Most people born in 1957 or after should have documentation of at least one dose of MMR vaccine. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends two doses of the vaccine. The first dose should be given at 12 months of age and the second between the ages of four to six years.

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    News release date: August 27, 2015